Because every flight should start with a good preflight…


  1. 1) You’re checking the maintenance logbook, and the last annual was completed on September 16th, 2021. Today is September 26th, 2022. Can you fly?

    According to FAR 91.409, an annual inspection needs to occur within the preceding 12 calendar months from the date it was last performed. This means that you can fly the plane all the way up to September 30th, 2022 before it needs an annual.

    According to FAR 91.409, an annual inspection needs to occur within the preceding 12 calendar months from the date it was last performed. This means that you can fly the plane all the way up to September 30th, 2022 before it needs an annual.

  2. 2) You check your oil, and it’s just under the low mark on the dipstick. Assuming you’re a private pilot, can you top it off yourself, or do you need a mechanic to fill it for you?

    According to FAR par 43, (c) Preventive maintenance (6) “Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.” is allowed by licensed pilots. 

    According to FAR par 43, (c) Preventive maintenance (6) “Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.” is allowed by licensed pilots. 

  3. 3) If you take a fuel sample and there’s water in it, where will it be in your fuel strainer?

    If you have water contamination, it will sink to the bottom of your fuel strainer, because water is heavier than avgas.

    If you have water contamination, it will sink to the bottom of your fuel strainer, because water is heavier than avgas.

  4. 4) You check your aircraft lights, and your red nav light isn’t working. Can you fly during the day (VFR) with it inoperative?

    According to 91.205 (c) (2), approved position lights (nav lights) are required for night flight, but not for day. As long as you make the lights inoperative per 91.213 (or an MEL, if that’s what you have), you’re good to go.

    According to 91.205 (c) (2), approved position lights (nav lights) are required for night flight, but not for day. As long as you make the lights inoperative per 91.213 (or an MEL, if that’s what you have), you’re good to go.

  5. 5) Finally, you get back to the cockpit, when you notice that your panel-mounted clock isn’t working. Can you fly during the day (VFR) with it inoperative?

    According to 91.205 (b), you don’t need a clock for daytime VFR flight. So as long as you make it inoperative per FAR 91.213, or MEL it if you have a minimum equipment list, you’re good to go.

    According to 91.205 (b), you don’t need a clock for daytime VFR flight. So as long as you make it inoperative per FAR 91.213, or MEL it if you have a minimum equipment list, you’re good to go.

Well, that was tough…

You scored % You could have done better, but you could have done worse.

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You have most of this preflight down…

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Nailed it!…

Nicely done, you scored %

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Source: boldmethod.com

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